Advertisements

Air France 447 – Brazilian Official Says Fire Unlikely in Airbus Crash

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

Published: June 4, 2009

WASHINGTON — As the Brazilian air force on Thursday recovered the first piece of floating debris in the Atlantic Ocean from the Air France jet that crashed with 228 on board, more questions than answers were emerging over how and when the Airbus A330 may have broken apart.

The Brazilian air force Web site reported that a helicopter crew extracted a structural support piece about eight feet long — which might have come from the jet’s cargo hold — about 340 miles northeast of Brazil’s Fernando de Noronha islands.

So far, the scant physical evidence from the crash has not helped investigators determine a cause.

A senior Brazilian military official said that a 12-mile-long fuel slick found on the surface of the ocean seemed to rule out a mid-air fire or explosion as the cause of the disaster.

But a pilot for Air Comet who was flying in the vicinity on Sunday night told the Spanish newspaper El Mundo in Thursday’s edition that he saw a bright flash of white light at the same time the Air France Flight 447 disappeared about 700 miles off the coast of Brazil on its way from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.

The chief executive of Air France, Pierre-Henri Gourgeon, said at a private meeting with families that the plane disintegrated either in the air or when it slammed into the ocean, and that and there were no survivors.

In acknowledging that it had found more debris on Thursday, news reports quoted a Brazilian military official as saying the color suggested it was internal parts of the plane.

“We don’t know if it’s the fuselage, (but it’s) probably internal because we found brown, white and two yellow bits,” Ramon Borges Cardoso, the director of the Air Space Control Department, said on Brazil’s Terra web site. “That doesn’t correspond to the external part of the airplane but rather the internal part, where you have the baggage hold, seats and covers.”

Mr. Cardoso said ships in the area were collecting debris to take to the operations base in Fernando de Noronha, a 12-hour round trip.

Experts are questioning whether extreme turbulence, a direct lightning strike, the speed of the aircraft during the stormy weather, or a pre-existing problem with the plane might have caused it to break up only four hours into the 11-hour flight.

Without the black boxes containing the plane’s voice and data recorders — which officials say may never be recovered the from the ocean — the only clues besides the scant debris exist in the series of 10 satellite signals.

The pilot sent a manual signal at 11 p.m. local time indicating that the plane was passing through an area of black, electrically charged cumulonimbus clouds, usually containing lightning and violent winds, according to The Associated Press. The news service, quoting an unidentified aviation official, presented a chilling timeline of events in the cockpit that reveal the plane’s ensuing problems within a 14-minute span, but not what caused them.

About 10 minutes after the manual signal, the plane sent out a series of automatic messages to indicate the autopilot had disengaged, a computer system had switched to alternative power and that controls to keep the plane stable had been damaged. About three minutes later, more automatic messages reported the failure of systems to monitor air speed, altitude and direction.

The last automatic message, which was received at 11:14 p.m. local time, signaled a loss of cabin pressure and complete electrical failure.

The system controlling these automatic signals, installed on all newer Airbus models, does not indicate the airplane’s location. Rather, it is designed to speed maintenance efforts by alerting maintenance technicians on the ground to problems before a plane lands, so they can be cleared up without delaying the next flight.

William R. Voss, president of the Flight Safety Foundation in Alexandria, Va, said in a telephone interview Thursday that the pattern of debris could indicate an in-flight break-up. Big debris that floats, Mr. Voss said, is generally not a flat sheet of aluminum, like part of the fuselage, but a more box-like structure, often the tail, and the tail often comes off first.

In this case, he said, searchers have come upon a big floating piece that was on the airplane’s likely track, indicating that it separated from the plane at high altitude, early in the event.

He noted that what was first reportedly radioed back from the automatic system was the auto pilot disengaging. This occurred, Mr. Voss said, either because a pilot saw something going wrong and took manual control or because the computerized auto pilot had a problem “and gave it back to him.”

“The sequence is pretty consistent with things going to hell from there,” he said.

Eleven planes and helicopters are involved in the search operation, the Brazilian military said, including a French ship with two remotely controlled submersible crafts that can be used to explore as deep as 19,600 feet and a United States Air Force P-3 Orion. A spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, Ted Lopatkiewicz, said his agency had worked with “civilian and military U.S. government agencies” to look for radar or satellite data for the area at the time of the crash but had not found any.

The federal safety board said late Wednesday that it would be part of the investigation; under international treaty, it will be involved because the engines were manufactured in the United States by General Electric. The role of the engines in the crash, if any, has not been determined.

But unlike other crash investigations that the agency joins, it will not be sending representatives, at least not yet. Peter Knudson, an agency spokesman, said that at the moment “there is no place to go.”

In many international crashes, the safety board makes its laboratory available for deciphering the cockpit voice recorder and helps in interpreting the flight data recorder. But in this case, involving a French airline and a European-built plane, that work will probably be done in France, experts said.

The main value of the debris found so far may be as a clue to the location of more important parts of the plane that are certain to have sunk, notably the black boxes. Each is equipped with a device that sends out an audio beep that in favorable conditions can be heard at 5,000 meters — about 3.1 miles. That signal begins to fade after 30 days.

The ocean is more than four miles deep in some parts of the area, and, while water is an excellent transmitter of sound, the sound waves are reflected at boundary layers where the water changes temperature, according to Duncan W. Schofield, a principal engineer at Honeywell, which built the boxes. Searchers can lower microphones to listen, but those are towed through the water at a a few miles per hour, increasing the need to narrow the search area.

Aviation experts said the flight data recorder was designed to track more than 400 categories of data, including the strength of turbulence and the functioning of various cockpit systems. And the cockpit voice recorder, if recovered, would indicate who was in the cockpit.

More than four hours into the flight, the captain, who is required to be at the controls for takeoff and landing, would typically have gone off for dinner and a nap, according to airline experts, leaving a relief pilot and the first officer at the controls, both typically less experienced but well qualified for what is ordinarily a very quiet phase of flight.

The plane was flying through an area of powerful thunderstorms, but there is no clear indication that the weather was unusual for the region.

“I don’t see anything unusual about these storms,” said Timothy A. Vasquez, a former Air Force meteorologist whose company, Weathergraphics, published a Web page showing the plane’s path and satellite data of storm intensity at the time of the crash. “Planes have flown through a lot worse; I’ve seen worse squall lines in Kansas and Missouri,” he said.

Matthew L. Wald reported from Washington, and Liz Robbins from New York. Reporting was contributed by Alan Cowell from London, Matthew Saltmarsh and Maïa de la Baume from Paris, Sharon Otterman from New York, and Andrew Downie from São Paulo, Brazil.

New York Times


Air France 447 – Brazilian Official Says Fire Unlikely in Airbus Crash

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

Published: June 4, 2009

WASHINGTON — As the Brazilian air force on Thursday recovered the first piece of floating debris in the Atlantic Ocean from the Air France jet that crashed with 228 on board, more questions than answers were emerging over how and when the Airbus A330 may have broken apart.

The Brazilian air force Web site reported that a helicopter crew extracted a structural support piece about eight feet long — which might have come from the jet’s cargo hold — about 340 miles northeast of Brazil’s Fernando de Noronha islands.

So far, the scant physical evidence from the crash has not helped investigators determine a cause.

A senior Brazilian military official said that a 12-mile-long fuel slick found on the surface of the ocean seemed to rule out a mid-air fire or explosion as the cause of the disaster.

But a pilot for Air Comet who was flying in the vicinity on Sunday night told the Spanish newspaper El Mundo in Thursday’s edition that he saw a bright flash of white light at the same time the Air France Flight 447 disappeared about 700 miles off the coast of Brazil on its way from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.

The chief executive of Air France, Pierre-Henri Gourgeon, said at a private meeting with families that the plane disintegrated either in the air or when it slammed into the ocean, and that and there were no survivors.

In acknowledging that it had found more debris on Thursday, news reports quoted a Brazilian military official as saying the color suggested it was internal parts of the plane.

“We don’t know if it’s the fuselage, (but it’s) probably internal because we found brown, white and two yellow bits,” Ramon Borges Cardoso, the director of the Air Space Control Department, said on Brazil’s Terra web site. “That doesn’t correspond to the external part of the airplane but rather the internal part, where you have the baggage hold, seats and covers.”

Mr. Cardoso said ships in the area were collecting debris to take to the operations base in Fernando de Noronha, a 12-hour round trip.

Experts are questioning whether extreme turbulence, a direct lightning strike, the speed of the aircraft during the stormy weather, or a pre-existing problem with the plane might have caused it to break up only four hours into the 11-hour flight.

Without the black boxes containing the plane’s voice and data recorders — which officials say may never be recovered the from the ocean — the only clues besides the scant debris exist in the series of 10 satellite signals.

The pilot sent a manual signal at 11 p.m. local time indicating that the plane was passing through an area of black, electrically charged cumulonimbus clouds, usually containing lightning and violent winds, according to The Associated Press. The news service, quoting an unidentified aviation official, presented a chilling timeline of events in the cockpit that reveal the plane’s ensuing problems within a 14-minute span, but not what caused them.

About 10 minutes after the manual signal, the plane sent out a series of automatic messages to indicate the autopilot had disengaged, a computer system had switched to alternative power and that controls to keep the plane stable had been damaged. About three minutes later, more automatic messages reported the failure of systems to monitor air speed, altitude and direction.

The last automatic message, which was received at 11:14 p.m. local time, signaled a loss of cabin pressure and complete electrical failure.

The system controlling these automatic signals, installed on all newer Airbus models, does not indicate the airplane’s location. Rather, it is designed to speed maintenance efforts by alerting maintenance technicians on the ground to problems before a plane lands, so they can be cleared up without delaying the next flight.

William R. Voss, president of the Flight Safety Foundation in Alexandria, Va, said in a telephone interview Thursday that the pattern of debris could indicate an in-flight break-up. Big debris that floats, Mr. Voss said, is generally not a flat sheet of aluminum, like part of the fuselage, but a more box-like structure, often the tail, and the tail often comes off first.

In this case, he said, searchers have come upon a big floating piece that was on the airplane’s likely track, indicating that it separated from the plane at high altitude, early in the event.

He noted that what was first reportedly radioed back from the automatic system was the auto pilot disengaging. This occurred, Mr. Voss said, either because a pilot saw something going wrong and took manual control or because the computerized auto pilot had a problem “and gave it back to him.”

“The sequence is pretty consistent with things going to hell from there,” he said.

Eleven planes and helicopters are involved in the search operation, the Brazilian military said, including a French ship with two remotely controlled submersible crafts that can be used to explore as deep as 19,600 feet and a United States Air Force P-3 Orion. A spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, Ted Lopatkiewicz, said his agency had worked with “civilian and military U.S. government agencies” to look for radar or satellite data for the area at the time of the crash but had not found any.

The federal safety board said late Wednesday that it would be part of the investigation; under international treaty, it will be involved because the engines were manufactured in the United States by General Electric. The role of the engines in the crash, if any, has not been determined.

But unlike other crash investigations that the agency joins, it will not be sending representatives, at least not yet. Peter Knudson, an agency spokesman, said that at the moment “there is no place to go.”

In many international crashes, the safety board makes its laboratory available for deciphering the cockpit voice recorder and helps in interpreting the flight data recorder. But in this case, involving a French airline and a European-built plane, that work will probably be done in France, experts said.

The main value of the debris found so far may be as a clue to the location of more important parts of the plane that are certain to have sunk, notably the black boxes. Each is equipped with a device that sends out an audio beep that in favorable conditions can be heard at 5,000 meters — about 3.1 miles. That signal begins to fade after 30 days.

The ocean is more than four miles deep in some parts of the area, and, while water is an excellent transmitter of sound, the sound waves are reflected at boundary layers where the water changes temperature, according to Duncan W. Schofield, a principal engineer at Honeywell, which built the boxes. Searchers can lower microphones to listen, but those are towed through the water at a a few miles per hour, increasing the need to narrow the search area.

Aviation experts said the flight data recorder was designed to track more than 400 categories of data, including the strength of turbulence and the functioning of various cockpit systems. And the cockpit voice recorder, if recovered, would indicate who was in the cockpit.

More than four hours into the flight, the captain, who is required to be at the controls for takeoff and landing, would typically have gone off for dinner and a nap, according to airline experts, leaving a relief pilot and the first officer at the controls, both typically less experienced but well qualified for what is ordinarily a very quiet phase of flight.

The plane was flying through an area of powerful thunderstorms, but there is no clear indication that the weather was unusual for the region.

“I don’t see anything unusual about these storms,” said Timothy A. Vasquez, a former Air Force meteorologist whose company, Weathergraphics, published a Web page showing the plane’s path and satellite data of storm intensity at the time of the crash. “Planes have flown through a lot worse; I’ve seen worse squall lines in Kansas and Missouri,” he said.

Matthew L. Wald reported from Washington, and Liz Robbins from New York. Reporting was contributed by Alan Cowell from London, Matthew Saltmarsh and Maïa de la Baume from Paris, Sharon Otterman from New York, and Andrew Downie from São Paulo, Brazil.

New York Times


Air France 447 – França mantém silêncio sobre investigação do acidente com o voo AF 447

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

da Efe

Quatro dias após desaparecer sobre o oceano Atlântico, continuam não esclarecidas as causas do acidente com o avião da Air France que fazia a rota entre Rio de Janeiro e Paris, no qual viajavam 228 pessoas.

Alguns especialistas estimam que os destroços encontrados pela FAB (Força Aérea Brasileira) oferecem a prova de que o avião caiu no mar, outros, no entanto, apostam que o aparelho explodiu no ar.

Leia a cobertura completa sobre o voo AF 447
Veja nomes de passageiros que estavam no avião da Air France
Veja onde conseguir informações sobre o voo

Em meio às dúvidas, os responsáveis pela investigação na França mantêm silêncio sobre as mais recentes averiguações. Na falta de explicações oficiais, a imprensa francesa, e também a brasileira, oferece detalhes extraoficiais do que pode ter acontecido.

A única informação concreta que se sabe e que foi reiterada hoje pelo presidente da companhia Air France, Jean-Cyril Spinetta, é que é está descartada a existência de sobreviventes do voo AF 447, porque o aparelho se desintegrou.

O porta-voz das famílias, Guillaume de Saint-Marc, disse que Spinetta e outros diretores da companhia aérea informaram a parentes dos passageiros e tripulação que “o avião não conseguiu amarar (pousar no mar) e que se desintegrou, seja no ar ou em contato com o mar”.

A grande extensão da área do Atlântico onde foram detectados alguns destroços do aparelho leva a crer que pode ter ocorrido uma explosão no ar, segundo a versão divulgada pelo jornal “Le Figaro”, que citou em sua edição desta quinta-feira fontes da investigação não identificadas.

“É possível observar fragmentos ao longo de uma distância de mais de 300 km”, segundo a fonte do jornal francês, que acrescenta que isso “apoia (a teoria) de uma explosão, que teria afetado a aeronave em pleno voo, mais do que a de uma destruição ao entrar em contato com o mar”.

O jornal acrescenta que, se tivesse ocorrido uma explosão a cerca de 10.000 metros de altura, isso se explicaria tanto por causa de um fenômeno meteorológico “excepcionalmente violento” quanto por uma “brusca despressurização” ou um “atentado terrorista”.

O jornal “Le Monde” afirmou que o Airbus-A330 desaparecido voava a uma velocidade “equivocada”, acrescentando que, pelo “encadeamento de eventos catastróficos”, aconteceu a desintegração do aparelho em pleno voo.

O jornal tira estas conclusões das mensagens que o avião enviou automaticamente antes de se perder o contato com o aparelho.

O Escritório de Pesquisas e Análises (BEA, em francês) não publicou novas informações em relação às circunstâncias nas quais o avião desapareceu, depois que ontem seus representantes advertiram que será difícil encontrar as caixas-pretas.

No entanto, precisou também que, mesmo se esses dispositivos de registro de operações de voo fossem encontrados, não estaria garantida a possibilidade de que determinassem o que aconteceu.

O BEA, que pretende publicar um primeiro relatório no final do mês, é responsável pela “investigação de segurança”, destinada a evitar que alguma falha ou algum problema possa se repetir no futuro, já que a aeronave tinha registro francês e caiu em águas internacionais do Atlântico.

Divulgação
Imagem divulgada pela Aeronáutica em local de buscas ao Airbus mostra mancha de óleo no Atlântico
Imagem divulgada pela Aeronáutica em local de buscas ao Airbus mostra mancha de óleo no Atlântico


Air France 447 – Air France jet crash debris retrieved

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (CNN) — The Brazilian navy began retrieving debris Thursday from an Air France passenger jet which crashed into the Atlantic Ocean with 228 people onboard as investigators continued to hunt for clues into the cause of the accident.

Image released by the Brazilian Air Force shows oil slicks in the water near a debris site.

Image released by the Brazilian Air Force shows oil slicks in the water near a debris site.

Helicopters were lifting pieces from the water and dropping them on three naval vessels.

var CNN_ArticleChanger = new CNN_imageChanger(‘cnnImgChngr’,’/2009/WORLD/americas/06/04/plane.crash/imgChng/p1-0.init.exclude.html’,2,1); //CNN.imageChanger.load(‘cnnImgChngr’,’imgChng/p1-0.exclude.html’);

Brazilian Air Force planes spotted an oil slick and four debris fields Wednesday but rain and rough seas had kept searchers from plucking any of the debris from the water.

Investigators have not determined what caused the plane to crash. The flight data recorders have not been recovered, and the plane’s crew did not send any messages indicating problems before the plane disappeared.

A Spanish pilot said he saw an “intense flash” in the area where Flight 447 came down off the coast of Brazil, while a Brazilian minister appeared to rule out a mid-air explosion.

Meanwhile, a report in France suggested the pilots were perhaps flying at the “wrong speed” for the violent thunderstorm they flew into early on Monday before the Airbus A330’s systems failed.

Le Monde newspaper reported that Airbus was sending a warning to operators of A330 jets with new advice on flying in storms.

As several ships trawled the crash site in the Atlantic, Brazil’s defense minister said a 20-kilometer (12-mile) oil slick near where the plane, en route from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, went down indicated it probably did not break up until it hit the water.

If true, that would rule out an in-flight explosion as the cause of the crash of Air France Flight 447, Defense Minister Nelson Jobim told reporters.

However, both pilots of an Air Comet flight from Lima to Lisbon sent a written report on the bright flash they said they saw to Air France, Airbus and the Spanish civil aviation authority, the airline told CNN.

“Suddenly, we saw in the distance a strong and intense flash of white light, which followed a descending and vertical trajectory and which broke up in six seconds,” the captain wrote.

Air Comet declined to identify the pilot’s name, but said he waited until landing to inform Air Comet management about what he saw. Air Comet then informed Spanish civil aviation authorities. The Air Comet co-pilot, and a passenger aboard the same flight, also saw the light.

But Robert Francis, former vice chairman of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, said the question of determining where a plane broke up “is a very difficult one to deal with.” He told CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” that “there are lots of things that cause a plane to go out of control.”

He added that extremely strong winds are not unusual near Brazil. Pilots who fly over that part of the world keep track of radar and “are very, very wary about the weather as they go back and forth down in that area.”

Jobim said currents had strewn the debris widely and that the search area had been expanded to 300 square miles. Video Watch report on the struggle to find pieces of the plane »

The Airbus A330 went down about three hours after beginning what was to have been an 11-hour flight. No survivors have been found. Map of Flight AF 447’s flight path »

Among Wednesday’s finds were objects in a circular 5-kilometer (3-mile) area, including one object with a diameter of 7 meters (23 feet) and 10 other objects, some of which were metallic, Brazilian Air Force spokesman Jorge Amaral said.

Searchers found two debris fields and identified the wreckage as coming from Flight 447. The debris was found about 650 kilometers (400 miles) northeast of the Fernando de Noronha Islands, an archipelago 355 kilometers off the northeast coast of Brazil. It included an airplane seat and an orange float.

Eleven aircraft and five ships are engaged in the search, including airplanes from France and the U.S. Video Watch as experts question whether recovery is possible »

The NTSB said Wednesday it has accepted an invitation from the French aviation accident investigation authority, the Bureau d’Enquetes et d’Analyses, to aid in the investigation.

The aircraft’s computer system did send about four minutes of automated messages indicating a loss of cabin pressure and an electrical failure, officials have said.

Some investigators have noted that the plane flew through a severe lightning storm. Foul play has not been ruled out.

Air France had received a bomb threat May 27 for a flight from Buenos Aires, Argentina, to Paris, sources in the Argentine military and police told CNN on Wednesday.

According to the officials, who had been briefed on the incident and declined to be identified because of the ongoing investigation, the Air France office in Buenos Aires received the threat from a man speaking Spanish.

Authorities checked the Boeing 777 and found nothing. Security was tightened during check-in for Flight 415, which left on time and without incident, the officials said.

Although officials have said the likelihood of finding survivors of Flight 447’s crash are small, authorities have not closed the door on the possibility.

Most of the people on the flight came from Brazil, France and Germany. The remaining victims were from 29 other countries, including three passengers from the United States.

French officials say they may never find the jet’s flight data recorders in the ocean that experts say is up to 7,500 meters (24,600 feet) deep in the area where the plane crashed.

But Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva expressed optimism that the recorders, also known as black boxes, would be found.

The recorders are built to emit locator signals for up to 30 days. The French government has sent a research vessel carrying a deep-diving submersible to where the debris was found.

CNN correspondent John Zarrella in Rio de Janeiro and journalist Brian Byrnes from Buenos Aires contributed to this report.


Air France 447 – Helicóptero da Marinha resgata do Atlântico primeira peça do Airbus da Air France

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

da Folha Online

Uma peça de 2,5 metros quadrados utilizada para acomodação de cargas em aviões e duas boias do Airbus que fazia o voo 447 da Air France foram resgatadas das águas do Atlântico por volta das 13h desta quinta-feira. Segundo a Aeronáutica, o objeto foi avistado distante 550 km de Fernando de Noronha (PE) pelo avião C-130 Hércules da FAB (Força Aérea Brasileira). É a primeira peça da aeronave retirada do oceano.

A Aeronáutica informou que a peça foi resgatada por um helicóptero Lynx que estava na fragata Constituição, uma das três embarcações da Marinha engajadas nas buscas.

Leia a cobertura completa sobre o voo AF 447
Veja nomes de passageiros que estavam no avião da Air France
Veja onde conseguir informações sobre o voo

As três embarcações da marinha mercante –dois de bandeira holandesa e um de bandeira francesa– deixaram as áreas das buscas nesta quarta-feira (3). De acordo com a Marinha, eles tiveram problemas logísticos –um dos navios de bandeira holandesa iria ficar sem combustível se permanecesse nas águas próximas aos destroços.

O trabalho da Aeronáutica e da Marinha estão sendo feitos de forma integrada. Cabe às aeronaves orientar os locais de encontro das peças e passar as coordenadas geográficas aos navios.

No mar, a coordenação dos trabalhos de busca estão sob o comando da embarcação Constituição no que eles denominam CCA (Comando de Cena de Ação). Auxiliando os trabalhos da Constituição, que é uma fragata, estão o navio-patrulha Grajaú e a corveta Caboclo.

Na manhã desta quinta, a Aeronáutica informou ter localizado mais destroços do avião, entre eles mais partes internas da aeronave.

“Estávamos dando uma prioridade para corpos, mas como não estamos encontrando, não podemos aguardar mais tempo para recolher os destroços. Então, vamos começar a fazer as duas coisas ao mesmo tempo”, disse em Recife o brigadeiro Ramon Borges Cardoso, diretor do Decea (diretor do Departamento de Controle do Espaço Aéreo).

Divulgação
Imagem divulgada pela Aeronáutica em local de buscas ao Airbus mostra mancha de óleo no Atlântico
Imagem divulgada pela Aeronáutica em local de buscas ao Airbus mostra mancha de óleo no Atlântico

Base

O comando da Aeronáutica está adaptando a base operacional de Fernando de Noronha e do Cindacta 3 (Centro Integrado de Defesa Aérea e Controle de Tráfego Aéreo), em Recife, para receber os destroços do avião da Air France que fazia o voo 447.

O destino dos destroços do voo 447 localizados pela FAB (Força Aérea Brasileira) no oceano Atlântico será definido pelo governo francês. Como as investigações serão tocadas pelo Centro de Investigação de Acidentes Aéreos da França, o governo brasileiro não terá autonomia para decidir o que será feito com o material.

Homenagens

Na manhã desta quinta, uma cerimônia foi realizada na igreja da Candelária, no Rio, para lembrar os 228 ocupantes do voo 447 –12 tripulantes e 216 passageiros, sendo 58 brasileiros, segundo a companhia aérea.

A Arquidiocese do Rio marcou para a sexta-feira (5) uma missa em solidariedade aos parentes dos ocupantes do avião desaparecido.

Em nota, a Arquidiocese informa que a missa será celebrada na paróquia de Nossa Senhora do Carmo da Antiga Sé (rua Primeiro de Março, esquina com rua Sete de Setembro), na próxima sexta, às 18h.

Sem esperanças

Diretores da Air France informaram aos familiares franceses de ocupantes do voo 447 que não há esperanças de encontrar sobreviventes.

“O que está claro é que não houve pouso. Não há possibilidade de os dispositivos de salvamento terem sido acionados”, afirmou nesta quinta-feira Guillaume Denoix de Saint-Marc, acionado para ajudar no aconselhamento nas famílias de vítimas.

Investigações

As investigações ficaram sob responsabilidade da França, que ontem admitiu as dificuldades de esclarecer as causas do acidente.

Os destroços serão levados para Fernando de Noronha e, em seguida, para Recife. Segundo Jobim, as peças serão entregues à França, país responsável pelas investigações.

Com Associeted Press e Folha de S.Paulo


Air France 447 – Comando da Aeronáutica – Nota 11

Click here for more news / Clique aqui para mais notícias

04/06/2009 – 13h44
Nota 11

RELATÓRIO DAS BUSCAS DO VOO 447 DA AIR FRANCE

O Comando da Aeronáutica informa que nesta manhã o avião C-130 Hércules da Força Aérea Brasileira avistou destroços a 550 km de Fernando de Noronha. De acordo com o planejado, a aeronave orientou a Fragata Constituição, da Marinha do Brasil, até o local para que o material pudesse ser recolhido. O helicóptero Lynx, embarcado na Fragata, resgatou por volta das 13h, um suporte utilizado para acomodação de cargas em aviões (Pallet), de aproximadamente 2,5 m2, e duas bóias.

Fonte: Centro de Comunicação Social da Aeronáutica