Emirates Moves NY A380s To Toronto, Bangkok

Darren Shannon darren_shannon@aviationweek.com

Emirates this summer is planning to redeploy the Airbus A380s currently assigned to the carrier’s twice daily service between Dubai and New York Kennedy as it adapts to shifts in demand and limitations of an air services agreement between the UAE and Canada.

Starting June 1, the carrier will allocate one of the two A380s currently serving New York to its thrice-weekly route to Toronto, while the second ultra-widebody assigned to JFK will be placed into service on one of Emirates’ twice daily flights from between Dubai and Bangkok.

At the same time, Emirates will start operating Boeing 777-300ERs to New York in a move that effectively swaps the capacity currently assigned to Bangkok and Toronto.

Emirates’ A380s seat 14 in first class, 76 in business, and 399 in economy, while the 777-300ERs are configured with eight seats in first, 42 in business, and 304 in coach.

The shift is due in part to an anticipated change in summer demand to New York and a condition of an air service agreement that limits Emirates’ Toronto service to three flights a week. The small changes to the North American summer schedule do not affect the expansion of Emirates services to Los Angeles and San Francisco, which grow to daily from thrice-weekly on May 1.

“We are extremely pleased to provide the A380 for our Dubai-Toronto service, which has had consistently strong demand since the three times weekly route was launched in October, 2007,” noted Emirates President Tim Clark in a release.

He added, “In fact, the demand has been so high it will only allow Emirates to address some of the unmet need of the Toronto market. Despite the current economic difficulties, this is good news for the Canadian economy. We believe you need a long-term view. By adding this new ultra-efficient aircraft to Toronto, we are increasing trade and tourism capacity, but the three flights a week restriction remains a disappointment. We believe Toronto needs a daily A380 service and progressively, a second daily service with an aircraft like the 777.”

Emirates announced this capacity shift just after German publication Der Spiegel released an article noting significant reliability issues in the carrier’s A380 fleet.

Photo credit: Emirates


Threat to MilSpace Funding Concerns U.K.

By Douglas Barrie

Concern is growing among British companies that London will not support military space research for at least the coming financial year, a move apparently at odds with the Defense Ministry’s just-released Defense Technology Plan.

The document identifies two space-based deep and persistent demonstrations as part of its overall approach to potential high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) requirements. “Small satellite international research collaboration” and the “design, build and launch [of]small satellite demonstrators” are identified within the DTP as areas of “potential further activity.” Each is identified as covering the period from April 2009—the start of the financial year—until 2013.

There is renewed interest within elements of the U.K. military into acquiring a national space-based surveillance capability. The continuing success of the Qinetiq-led Topsat electro-optical surveillance satellite demonstrator—partly funded by the Defense Ministry—is underscoring the potential of such systems. The satellite provides 3-meter resolution imagery, with an overall weight of 120 kg. (264 lb.).

Air Vice Marshal Tim Anderson, the assistant chief of the air staff, has in the past suggested that “a national [satellite] capability [as] a luxury may no longer be appropriate.”

Next-generation “overhead” systems have been identified previously by the ministry as a contributor to what it terms the “Floodlight” element of its intelligence surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance strategy. Up until now, the U.K. has been reliant on its privileged access to U.S. space-based systems: Industry and some within the ministry have been arguing that a national collection system would be a valuable complement.

The Defense Ministry is now in the throes of finalizing its latest spending plan, known as Planning Round 09. Military and industry officials have previously confirmed that funding pressures would potentially present the ministry with difficult choices. The obvious priority of meeting urgent requirements for Afghanistan, combined with the draw this has on overall defense funding, however, means the ministry is struggling to meet all of its aspirations.

Defense industry executives suggest that the ministry appears to be cutting any funding for space research for the next financial year, a move one executive describes as “dispiriting.” Arguably this is particularly so, given the relatively small amount of money required.

One potential follow-on to Topsat offered by industry to the Defense Ministry was a proposal known as SkySight. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd., now a subsidiary of EADS Astrium, had put forward an electro-optical satellite project based on the SSTL-300 platform. A four-strong constellation was suggested, with the first two satellites offering a resolution of 1.2 meters (4 ft.). The last two satellites would have provided the ministry with submetric resolution.

Industry is also arguing that space-based sensors are complementary to long-endurance air-breathing systems. However, the Defense Ministry, in prioritizing requirements, is not placing any immediate emphasis on the acquisition of a HALE platform. The ministry’s Unmanned Air System Capability Investigation report effectively “parked” any near-term need for a HALE, according to military officials, although the requirement will be developed in the longer term.

British space-industry lobby group UKSpace is also trying to invigorate and bolster wider support within government for space-related research and development. Its “Space Secures Prosperity” report, published in September 2008, argues that a U.K. national space-based reconnaissance capability would potentially provide a broader benefit than to just the Defense Ministry.

Proponents of a national capability maintain that a U.K. asset would give London the ability to prioritize tasking to meet national requirements, rather than having to be dependent on the U.S. While the U.K. is extremely well served in its ability to access U.S. national technical means, it inevitably remains second in the queue to Washington’s own priorities. The ability to provide satellite intelligence on even a limited reciprocal basis would also be beneficial.

Industry wants to secure ministry support to help it develop the basis of systems that could be exported, building on the U.K.’s strength in the small-satellite sector.

Image: Qinetiq


Discovery Astronauts To Inspect Orbiter

By Frank Morring, Jr.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. – Astronauts on the space shuttle Discovery planned to spend March 16 using a 50-foot-long boom to inspect the belly, nose and wing leading edges of their orbiter for any of the sort of damage that doomed the shuttle Columbia.

Known as the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), the robotic-arm extender was invented after Columbia’s thermal protection system was damaged by a piece of insulating foam that fell onto the left wing during ascent, cracking it so the superheated gas of re-entry could get inside and melt its lightweight aluminum structure.

The team that watches long-range video of shuttle launches saw no immediate indication that anything struck Discovery’s ceramic thermal tiles and reinforced carbon-carbon wing leading edges and nose cap during the March 15 launch to the International Space Station (ISS). But that was just a first look, and the next two days will consume a lot of astronaut and engineering time to make sure the first reports were accurate.

Experts in Houston will work around the clock analyzing the data that comes back from the OBSS and its laser imager. When Discovery approaches the ISS for docking tomorrow, Mission Commander Lee Archambault will fly the now-standard rendezvous pitch maneuver at a range of about 600 feet, back flipping Discovery so the station crew can photograph its belly tiles with digital cameras and 400mm and 800mm lenses.

If any damage turns up, the OBSS may be called into action later in the mission for a focused inspection of the suspect area or areas.

Follow the On Space blog for updates on the mission.

Shuttle boom photo: NASA


EUA derrubaram UAV iraniano

O Pentágono informou que um caça dos EUA abateu um UAV iraniano voando sobre território iraquiano no mês passado. O informe oficial aponta que o UAV era do tipo Ababil 3 e que a presença do mesmo “não foi um acidente.” Ele teria sobrevoado o espaço aéreo iraquiano por 70 minutos antes de ser abatido. O UAV foi derrubado próximo à cidade fronteiriça de Mandali.

uav-iraniano1

Acredita-se que o Abadil tenha um alcance máximo de cerca de 90 km, podendo voar até 14.000 pés. Este tipo de UAV foi concebido essencialmente para a vigilância aérea e reconhecimento.

Em Agosto de 2006, um UAV desta mesma classe foi derrubado durante a noite por um F-16 próximo à costa norte de Israel. Naquela ocasião foi utilizado um míssil Rafael Python 5.


Brasil – Segundo analistas, Embraer perderá até 10% do seu valor de marca

Símbolo do Brasil no exterior, segundo alguns analistas de marca, a Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica (Embraer) perdeu o seu valor por conta da crise financeira global – que culminou na demissão dos seus funcionários. A estimativa da Brand Finance é de que a empresa perca entre 8% a 10% do seu valor de marca que, no último ranking (de 2007) ficou na 52ª colocação, com R$ 1,2 bilhão. O estudo de 2008 ainda não foi concluído.

Gilson Nunes, presidente da Brand Finance, diz que dois fatores impactam o valor da marca: o maior, segundo ele, é a parte de clientes internacionais, que se reflete no valor da empresa, e o outro é a percepção do mercado interno. De acordo com Nunes, a perda do valor da marca, no entanto, é menor que o valor da empresa. “Mas é esporádico: de um a dois anos”, afirma. Para o presidente da Brand Finance, não se trata, em nenhum momento de má gestão da empresa. E acrescenta que todas empresas do setor se depreciaram com a crise, que também atingiu outros setores – os mais prejudicados, na análise da consultoria, foram o automotivo e o de commodities. Para Nunes, a dimensão que se tem das demissões é de um ajuste operacional. “Não é incompetência”.

“Ninguém está 100% a salvo. Mas, as marcas com reputação corporativa maior passam pela crise mais facilmente”, diz o sócio-diretor da Troiano, Jaime Troiano. Ele lembra que a Embraer é um dos grandes ícones da capacidade brasileira de estar em outros mercados. “Não há como dizer que não será abalado. As demissões têm um efeito na opinião pública porque faz com que qualquer pessoa se sinta nesta posição. Se uma empresa como a Embraer demite, será que não estou tão ou mais inseguro?”. Troiano diz que foi por causa desta simbologia que o presidente Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva correu para tentar reverter as demissões. Nunes acrescenta que, como outras empresas também perderam valor de marca, a Embraer pode continuar na mesma classificação do ano anterior.

FONTE: Gazeta Mercantil, via NOTIMP


Brasil – Segundo analistas, Embraer perderá até 10% do seu valor de marca

Símbolo do Brasil no exterior, segundo alguns analistas de marca, a Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica (Embraer) perdeu o seu valor por conta da crise financeira global – que culminou na demissão dos seus funcionários. A estimativa da Brand Finance é de que a empresa perca entre 8% a 10% do seu valor de marca que, no último ranking (de 2007) ficou na 52ª colocação, com R$ 1,2 bilhão. O estudo de 2008 ainda não foi concluído.

Gilson Nunes, presidente da Brand Finance, diz que dois fatores impactam o valor da marca: o maior, segundo ele, é a parte de clientes internacionais, que se reflete no valor da empresa, e o outro é a percepção do mercado interno. De acordo com Nunes, a perda do valor da marca, no entanto, é menor que o valor da empresa. “Mas é esporádico: de um a dois anos”, afirma. Para o presidente da Brand Finance, não se trata, em nenhum momento de má gestão da empresa. E acrescenta que todas empresas do setor se depreciaram com a crise, que também atingiu outros setores – os mais prejudicados, na análise da consultoria, foram o automotivo e o de commodities. Para Nunes, a dimensão que se tem das demissões é de um ajuste operacional. “Não é incompetência”.

“Ninguém está 100% a salvo. Mas, as marcas com reputação corporativa maior passam pela crise mais facilmente”, diz o sócio-diretor da Troiano, Jaime Troiano. Ele lembra que a Embraer é um dos grandes ícones da capacidade brasileira de estar em outros mercados. “Não há como dizer que não será abalado. As demissões têm um efeito na opinião pública porque faz com que qualquer pessoa se sinta nesta posição. Se uma empresa como a Embraer demite, será que não estou tão ou mais inseguro?”. Troiano diz que foi por causa desta simbologia que o presidente Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva correu para tentar reverter as demissões. Nunes acrescenta que, como outras empresas também perderam valor de marca, a Embraer pode continuar na mesma classificação do ano anterior.

FONTE: Gazeta Mercantil, via NOTIMP


Aviação russa poderá fazer escala e reabastecer na Venezuela

tu-160

Bombardeiros russos de longo alcance poderão fazer escala e reabastecer na Venezuela, segundo uma proposta do presidente venezuelano, Hugo Chávez, e estão prontos para fazer o mesmo em Cuba, se a Rússia chegar a um acordo com as autoridades da ilha, afirmou hoje um general russo.

Chávez autorizou os bombardeiros russos a fazer escala na base aeronaval da ilha caribenha de La Orchila durante suas missões no Atlântico e junto ao continente americano, disse Anatoli Zhijarev, chefe do Estado-Maior da Aviação Estratégica da Rússia.

“O presidente da Venezuela nos fez essa proposta, que poderemos aproveitar se houver a correspondente decisão política” do Kremlin, disse o general à agência “Interfax”.

Zhijarev liderou a missão dos dois bombardeiros estratégicos russos TU-160 que, em setembro do ano passado, aterrissaram pela primeira vez na Venezuela e durante uma semana realizaram voos de teste no Caribe, em uma visita que Chávez qualificou de “gesto de fraternidade e apoio” que devia dar “mais segurança” a seu país.

O general acrescentou que os bombardeiros russos também poderiam fazer escala em Cuba, pois a ilha “dispõe de quatro ou cinco aeródromos com longas pistas de aterrissagem, de 4 mil metros”.

“Se houver a vontade política dos chefes de ambos os Estados, estamos prontos para voar até aquele país”, disse o chefe da aviação estratégica russa, que em agosto de 2007 retomou, após uma interrupção de 15 anos, os voos de patrulha no Atlântico e em outras regiões distantes onde a Rússia diz ter “interesses estratégicos”.

O presidente russo, Dmitri Medvedev, viajou no final do ano passado à Venezuela e Cuba, o que coincidiu com a primeira visita de navios da Marinha russa a ambos os países latino-americanos após o fim da Guerra Fria.

FONTE: EFE, via G1

Líder venezuelano nega oferta de base militar à Rússia

O presidente da Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, negou ontem que tenha oferecido parte do território de seu país para a instalação de uma base militar russa. A afirmação foi feita um dia depois de o general russo Anatoly Zhikharev ter anunciado que Chávez havia oferecido a Moscou uma ilha como base temporária para bombardeios estratégicos. Apesar da negativa, Chávez disse que aviões russos sempre poderão fazer escala na Venezuela durante voos de longa duração. Em setembro, o país recebeu jatos russos para treinamento de voo.

FONTE: O Estado de São Paulo